Central Cooperative Wholesale, Records, 1916-1969

Immigration History Research Center
University of Minnesota

| Provenance/Processing | Biographical Sketch | Scope and Content | Preliminary Container List


IHRC #118
Records, 1916-1969
18 linear feet (47 boxes)
Inventory

Provenance/Processing

The records of the Central Cooperative Wholesale were acquired for the Immigration History Research Center by Michael G. Karni in August 1971 from Midland Cooperatives, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota.  The collection was processed and the inventory prepared by Timo R. Riippa in 1990-1992.  Inventory formatted for the Internet by Student Assistants Paul Bowman, Rachel Brophy, Executive Secretary Cindy Herring and Assistant Curator Daniel Necas in 2002.

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Historical Sketch

The Finnish American cooperative movement arose at the turn of the century in response to the economic insecurity experienced by immigrants, many of whom were unskilled wage earners and backwoods farmers.  Throughout the country in areas of heavy Finnish population such as Astoria, Oregon, Waukegan, Illinois, and Ashtabula Harbor, Ohio, the first generation immigrants began forming local consumers' cooperatives, often with little or no business experience on the part of the members.  Yet most of the ventures thrived.  Toward the end of the 1910s, local cooperative stores began to join with other Finnish co-ops in the respective areas to form regional cooperative associations.  In the New England area, for example, eight Finnish cooperatives in Massachusetts and New Hampshire formed the United Cooperative Society in 1919.1

The Central Cooperative Wholesale (hereafter CCW) was established in July, 1917 in Superior, Wisconsin as the Central Cooperative Exchange (CCE).2  Nineteen delegates representing nine Finnish American cooperatives from Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan met to create a central purchasing organization to serve the member cooperative societies.  The corporate headquarters and warehouse operations were situated in Superior, Wisconsin.  During the early 1920s CCE gradually grew in membership and sales.  By 1928 there were 84 member societies whose sales totaled well over one million dollars.

Although the Finnish American consumers' cooperative movement embraced all segments of the Finnish community, it had been started largely by and had received considerable impetus from Socialists, who viewed cooperativism as an economic adjunct to the working class movement.  In fact, during the split within the Socialist Party of the United States in the early 1920s, key members of the CCE staff supported the left-wing faction, which favored recognition of the Third International and which was to become the Workers' (Communist) Party of America.  Among the early leaders of the CCE who belonged to the Party were General Manager Eskel Ronn, Education Department Head George Halonen and Executive Board members Matt Tenhunen and Oscar Corgan.

However, when the Communist Party in New York sought to bring the CCW and the larger Finnish American cooperative movement under tight Party control in the late 1920s, an intense conflict developed not only in the CCW's leadership, but also in the membership at large.  In the struggle over the direction the Finnish cooperative movement was to take, both Tenhunen and Corgan aligned themselves with Party loyalists who supported a militant, working class cooperativism, while Halonen and Ronn led those who promoted a neutral, non-political direction based on Rochdale principles.3  After supporters for the two sides waged a year long, often bitter campaign in Finnish communities not only in the midwest, but throughout the United States, the issue came to a vote at the CCE's 1930 annual meeting in Superior where those favoring a neutral course formed a decisive majority.

As the CCW began pursuing a non-political course from 1930 onward, it strengthened its position with non-radical Finns and the larger Finnish American community.  The organization prospered and flourished during the 1930s as it turned its attention to the creation of new consumers' cooperatives, the expansion of existing stores, and cooperative educational and social activities.  In 1933 it established its own publishing house, the Cooperative Publishing Association.  By 1940 the CCW had over 100 member societies with combined sales of over 14 million dollars.  The majority of these were dominated by the Finns.

The successful growth of the organization can be attributed in large part to effective leadership and management as the CCW sought to combine business operations with the ideological aims of consumers' cooperativism.  Over the years its general organizational structure changed very little.  Direction and supervision in policy-making came from the Board of Directors, which was responsible to and acted in behalf of the general membership.  A General Manager, the organization's chief executive officer, managed affairs in accordance with the directives of the Board.  The number of departments under the General Manager varied over time, but chief among them Education, Finance, Distribution, and Plant Operations.  Department heads made up an Executive Committee which assisted the General Manager.  Reflecting the emphasis that the cooperative ideology placed on educational work, the real work-horse of the CCW's various sub-divisions was the Educational Department, which had oversight of leadership training, public relations, publications, women's guilds and clubs, and organizational fieldwork.  A good share of the educational work was carried on by the Northern States Womens' Cooperative Guild which was organized in 1930.4   The Guild organized summer youth camps, had charge of the youth program in general, promoted the cooperative movement with fair booths and other projects, and served as a contact between homemakers and the CCW's commodity program.

The success of the CCW can also be attributed to the time and energy that the Education Department devoted to educational efforts and training courses for member societies.  These courses not only taught practical applications of the Rochdale principles, but they also provided a thorough foundation in areas such as sound business management, marketing, advertising, and employee training.  The Education Department's outreach activity is perhaps best exemplified by the scholarship contests it sponsored for high school seniors in the late 1950s and early 1960s.  These essay contests, which revolved around cooperative themes, drew applicants from Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, and North and South Dakota and played a major role in the organization's youth program.  They were clearly aimed at building favorable attitudes toward the cooperative movement by acquainting young people with its goals, values, and benefits.  Contest themes like "How Can Cooperatives Strengthen American Democracy" conveyed the message that cooperatives are an integral part of the free enterprise system.

For many members of the Finnish American first generation the local co-op store was much more than merely a retail business that they considered their own.  The cooperative movement represented a way of life, providing not only for their material, but social and cultural needs as well.  This was particularly true of rural areas where Co-op halls were the sites of dances, concerts, evening socials, lectures, and plays.  With changing times and conditions, and with the passing of the immigrant generation, the social and cultural functions of the co-ops decreased in importance.  Control of the organization gradually passed into the hands of the American born and the CCW began to shed its Finnish image.  The organization had already employed its first non-Finnish speaking fieldmen in 1930.  In the late 1930s the CCW hired its first non-Finnish editor (Oscar Cooley) for the Co-operative Pyramid Builder.  Its last bilingual annual meeting was held in 1948.5

Changing social patterns and economic trends in the United States during the post World War II period also had an effect on consumer cooperatives.  The traditional, close-knit nature of the rural community began to change as the population became more mobile.  Younger people not only moved to urban areas in search of work, but rural shoppers were also willing to travel longer distances by car in search of bargains.  With the growth of mass merchandising, many of the small cooperative stores established by immigrants found it increasingly difficult to compete, particularly in larger towns.  Yet, despite increasing numbers of store closures in rural regions in the 1950s and increased competition in urban areas from supermarkets and shopping centers, the CCW continued to hold its own and even experience monetary growth.  By 1952 it had 207 member societies of which 156 reported combined sales of $58 million.  Although the CCW also experienced its first net operating loses in history in 1952, it soon stabilized its financial position with numerous belt-tightening measures, among them a "Reverse the Trend" drive to encourage cash policies and discourage credit sales.

As competition steadily increased, as consumers' shopping habits changed, and as profit margins gradually declined, the management of the CCW found the idea of merger an increasingly attractive option.  Ever since the 1940s the organization had explored the possibility from time to time with Minneapolis-based Midland Cooperatives, but it was not until the 1950s that both organizations became increasingly aware of the high cost of offering similar services in overlapping trading regions.  In the early 1960s a joint committee from the two cooperatives concluded that there were attractive benefits to merging and no compelling reasons against it.  On November 30, 1963 CCW merged with Midland Cooperatives, Inc.

During its 45 year existence the Central Cooperative Wholesale became one of the most successful Finnish sponsored economic ventures in the United States.  In the final analysis, the CCW and the consumers' cooperative movement that it represented played several important roles in Finnish American history.  Its political neutrality allowed it to serve a significant integrative role in bringing together the various factions of the Finnish American community.  It was also the one economic and social area in which interaction between the immigrant generation and the American born was the greatest.  In addition, the consumers' cooperative movement was the one Finnish institution that attracted not only the American boom Finns, but non-Finns as well.



1 A good overview of the Finnish American consumers' cooperative movement in the Midwest can be found in Arnold Alanen's "The Development and Distribution of Finnish Consumers' Cooperatives in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, 1903-1973," in The Finnish Experience in the Western Great Lakes Region: New Perspectives, eds.  Michael Karni, Matti Kaups, and Douglas Ollila, Jr. (Turku, Finland: Institute for Migration, 1975), 130.  The most complete study to date of the political aspects of this movement is Michael Karni's "Yhteishyva: -- Or, For the Common Good: Finnish Radicalism in the Western Great Lakes Region, 1900-1940" (Ph.D. diss., University of Minnesota, 1975).

2 The corporate name of the organization was Central Cooperative Exchange until 1939, when the name was changed to Central Cooperative Wholesale.  In 1956 the CCW became Central Cooperatives, Inc., the name it carried until its merger with Midland Cooperatives, Inc. in 1963.  CCE and CCW usually used the spelling "co-operative" (hyphenated) in their records, while CCI and Midland used "cooperative" (solid).  The solid version of the word (the first dictionary spelling) is used throughout this inventory.

3 Foremost among the Rochdale Principles of Cooperation, attributed to the founders of the first cooperative in Rochdale, England in 1844, are 1) open voluntary membership; 2) democratic control: each member has one vote; 3) limited return on investment: not more than the current legal rate of interest; 4) distribution of surplus profits to members; 5) allocation of funds for continuing cooperative education.

4 See also Records of Northern States Women's Cooperative Guild and the Torma-Silvola Papers in the IHRC's Finnish Collection.

5 For an interesting demographic analysis of the Finnish element in northern Minnesota co-ops in 1948, see V. S. Alanen, "Report on Survey of Range Cooperative Federation and Its Member Societies," box 28, folder 5.

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Scope and Content

The Central Cooperative Wholesale collection consists of corporate records and materials that document the life of an ethnic economic enterprise that grew from small, primarily rural beginnings into a successful multimillion dollar business.  The materials, which cover the period from 1916 to 1969, offer a rich body of documentation to researchers from a wide cross section of disciplines history, sociology, economics, business, education, among others.  The collection measures ca. 18 linear feet and consists of 47 boxes.

The Central Cooperative Wholesale collection is organized into the following series and subseries:

SERIES I: Minutes, Reports, and Incorporation Records of Central Cooperative Exchange, Central Cooperative Wholesale, Central Cooperatives, Inc. and Midland Cooperatives, Inc. (boxes 1-9)

            SUBSERIES:
            1. Central Cooperative Exchange
            2. Central Cooperative Wholesale
            3. Central Cooperatives, Inc.
            4. Midland Cooperatives, Inc.

SERIES II: Cooperative Publishing Association Records (box 9)

SERIES III: Finance Division Records (boxes 9-13)

SERIES IV: Education Division Records (boxes 13-29)

            SUBSERIES:
            1. Cooperative Schools
            2. Management Training and Development
            3. Scholarship Contests
            4. Field Reports
            5. Correspondence and Miscellaneous Records

SERIES V: People's Cooperative Society, Superior, WI, Records (boxes 29-31)

SERIES VI: Virginia Cooperative Society, Virginia, MN, Records (boxes 31-32)

SERIES VII: Photographs (boxes 32-47)

I. Minutes, Reports and Incorporation Records of Central Cooperative Exchange, Central Cooperative Wholesale, Central Cooperatives, Inc., and Midland Cooperatives, Inc.

CCE, CCW, and CCI corporate minutes and records are divided into five chronological subseries that reflect the corporate names under which the organization existed.  The collection also includes records from the immediate, post-merger period with Midland, which have been collected under the heading "Midland Cooperatives, Inc."

Subseries 1 covers the period from 1916 to 1939 and contains minutes of the Board of Directors as well as the Management Committee, an executive committee made up of division managers.  Included are minutes of annual and semi-annual meetings, articles of incorporation along with amendments, and correspondence regarding legal proceedings taken against a member cooperative in 1931.  The minutes were kept in Finnish until February 1939, when the transition to English took place.  Finnish minutes were kept in a separate bound volume until 1941.  The documents provide the researcher with the clearest picture of the CCE's establishment and organizational evolution during a period that saw its greatest growth and development. The earlier part of this period saw the split within the CCE, but the Board of Directors minutes for that period take a "business only" position and contain very little of anything that even suggests the intense struggle that took place in the Upper Midwest for control of the movement.

Subseries 2 contains the minutes and records of the Central Cooperative Wholesale, which range from 1939 to 1958.  These consist of minutes of the Board of Directors, the annual meetings, and the Management Committee, which changed its name to the Executive Committee in June 1947.  Included are audit reports and analyses.  Of particular interest are materials that reflect the organization's response to economic difficulties arising from the agricultural recession of the late 1940s and early 1950s.  Among these are records dealing with the establishment of a Management Service Program in 1947 to provide financial advice and managerial assistance to financially troubled member cooperatives.  This service directly relates to a campaign waged by the Finance and Education divisions to encourage cash sales and discourage the granting of credit to patrons.  Also of interest in this subseries are internal management reports and analyses which clearly reflect the introduction of management techniques by the college-trained, American-born, second generation.  Among these is a 1948 analysis of the comparative operations of Central States Cooperative, Midland Cooperatives, Inc., and Central Cooperative Wholesale that reflects a growing interest in the idea of merger in the interests of increasing efficiency and avoiding duplication of effort.

Subseries 3 contains minutes of the Board of Directors and annual meetings of the Central Cooperatives, Inc.  These records document the various management decisions and actions that led up to the merger with Midland Cooperatives, Inc., in 1963.

Subseries 4 contains records that document the period immediately following the merger of Central Cooperatives, Inc., with Midland Cooperatives, Inc.  Of particular interest among these is an in-depth analysis that Midland undertook to evaluate retail operations in the Consumer Goods Division.  The organization hired a management consulting firm to evaluate five large food and/or retail stores, all of them outlets of the former CCI.  The resulting report evaluated the supermarkets and stores on factors such as operating performance, marketing position, management methods, and merchandising techniques.  The three-part report clearly highlights the numerous factors involved in the decline of cooperative retail stores in the changing, competitive market of the late 1950s and early 1960s.

II. Cooperative Publishing Association Records

The records consist of articles of incorporation and bylaws from 1933 as well as amendments to the articles.  Also included are legal papers concerning the 1958 sale of the publishing company's assets to Central Cooperatives, Inc., and the articles of dissolution from 1961.

III.  Finance Division Records

The bulk of these records document the economic difficulties that member cooperatives encountered in the post World War II period, partly because of changing shopping patterns and marketing strategies, and specifically as a result of granting easy credit to patrons.  Consequently, many of these materials deal with the CCW's active encouragement of cash policies at member operatives.  A year-end report for 1948 outlines the CCW's financial situation.  There are reports on the cash vs. credit issue, a financial manual for member cooperatives, and correspondence with delinquent members relating to their overdue accounts receivable.  Included is a finance plan the CCW worked out with these member cooperatives.  Part of the records document the establishment of Central Finance, Inc., a finance company established by the CCW to extend time payment plans to customers for the purchase of large appliances and equipment.

IV.  Education Division Records

Responsible for the promotion and dissemination of the cooperative philosophy, the Education Division had responsibility for a wide range of activities ranging from public relations to leadership training.

Subseries 1 contains study materials for the Cooperative Training School, which trained students and future managers in the fundamentals of cooperativism.  The course outlines, student listings, and evaluation reports provide insight for the researcher into the nature and quality of the training.  The subseries also consists of correspondence, enrollment ledgers, and cooperative correspondence course materials such as "Consumer Cooperation in Principle and Practice," a twelve lesson course administered by the Cooperative Correspondence School which operated from 1943 to 1951.  Also included are materials from 1940 to 1945 relating to cooperative discussion groups, local education committees organized to spread the cooperative philosophy and support the local cooperative store.  These records include discussion outlines in both English and Finnish, names of group leaders, and lists of communities where discussion groups existed in Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.  The materials illustrate the ongoing transition in the 1940s from a predominantly Finnish-speaking to an English-speaking membership.

Subseries 2 vividly reflects an emphasis on the introduction and application of management techniques by a new generation of college-trained, second generation executives.  The numerous management courses and training programs in this section, most of which date from 1951-1954, provide the researcher with an idea of how much attention the CCW paid to maximization of efficiency at all organizational levels in a period of spiraling inflation and increased competition.

Subseries 3 documents Cooperative Scholarship Contests (1958-1963) for high school seniors in the Midwest.  Writers of essays were awarded $1000, $750, and $500 prizes, with district winners receiving merchandise awards.  The top three overall winners presented their essays at CCW's annual meeting.  This subseries includes over 500 student essays; application blanks from participants; evaluations of the contests; correspondence from schools, local co-ops, and individuals to the Education Division (the name had been changed to Member Services Division in 1959) regarding the contest as well as promotional materials sent out to high schools; cards listing all of the high school libraries receiving reference books; and cards listing the contestants from each high school.  The 500 student essays in themselves are a significant collection documenting early 1960s economic and political perceptions as reflected in the writings of young people, many of whom were third generation Finnish Americans.

Subseries 4 deals with the activities of the CCW field representatives, who made the initial contacts with interested people to organize local support for the establishment of a community cooperative.  The records consist of inquiries to CCW from individuals throughout the Midwest asking for information and instructions on forming a local consumers' cooperative.  Of particular economic and demographic interest are memos and reports from the fieldmen to the home office documenting the progress of local organizational work in the largely rural areas.  Numerous files contain name lists of prospective supporters in the individual communities.  Others contain model articles of incorporation and bylaws for the prospective co-ops.  Some of the files reflect competition with Midland Cooperatives, Inc.

Subseries 5 contains documentation on the public relations functions of the Education Division.  Bi-weekly activity reports as well as job descriptions for personnel provide an idea of the division's key role within the organization and the wide range of activities over which it had oversight.  Of special interest are the neighborhood discussion groups that the Education Division promoted during the 1940s.  These groups were made up of neighbors within a community, who would meet regularly in each others homes and, with the aid of a study guide, discuss common problems or interests within the context of cooperative philosophy.  The Education Division published monthly outlines and study guides for the groups in both Finnish and English.  Also of interest in this subseries is a 1948 survey of member cooperatives compiled by V. S. Alanne that covers not only questions relating to the financial state of the cooperatives, but also deals with demographic data and statistics on the composition of cooperatives, Americanization of the cooperatives, the use of Finnish at membership meetings, and the participation of women in the cooperative activities.  The Education Division's involvement in the cash vs. credit issue of the early 1950s is reflected in correspondence to and from member cooperatives.  Also reflected in the correspondence, inter-office memos, and reports from this period is the attention devoted to increasing efficiency within the CCW's corporate structure.

V. People's Cooperative Society Records

The People's Cooperative Society of Superior, Wisconsin, one of the largest member cooperatives in the CCW, was established in 1916.  It owned a large main store, two branch stores, and a service station with garage.  The records consist of Board of Directors minutes for the period from 1925 to 1953 and annual/ semi-annual Reports for 1927 to 1940.  The minutes, which also include occasional special meetings like the joint meeting of employees and directors, are in both Finnish and English up to 1935.  The Annual/Semi-annual Reports are only in English.  In January 1952 the People's Cooperative Society merged with the Superior Farmers' Union Cooperative to form the Superior Cooperative Association.  The records are of particular value to any researcher documenting the life span of a large ethnic economic enterprise.

VI. Virginia Cooperative Society Records

The Virginia Cooperative Society was established in 1909 as the Virginia Work People's Trading Company.  At the peak of its activity in the 1930s, it had about 1000 members, two stores, and a service station.  The records consist of the Board of Directors minutes for 1960 to 1969, when the cooperative went out of business.6

VII.  Photographs

The photographs come from the files of the Cooperative Publishing Association, where they were used as file photos for cooperative publications.  The photos retain the original in-house order given to them by the CPA.  They are organized into two groupings, the second of which consists largely of CCW personnel and individuals featured in cooperative newspapers.  The subject matter covers a wide range: historically significant events and individuals, photos of annual meetings, youth camps, member cooperatives, cooperative activities, headquarters buildings, and staff.  Included with photographs are silver plates and mattes.

In 2002 - 2003, selected photographs from the collection were digitized and made accessible online through the IHRC COLLAGE database of digital images by Erik Moore, COLLAGE Coordinator.  Please view these images at the links below:

1) Central Cooperative Wholesale warehouse and office building

2) Cooperators meeting

3) Red star label

4) Red star brand coffee can

5) Clearing dishes

6) Red star coffee with the red star chorus

Note: For additional images of items from the collection, please search COLLAGE using "central cooperative" as keywords.



6 See also Records of the Virginia Cooperative Trading Society (ca. 1911-1962) in the Immigration History Research Center's Finnish Collection.  When the cooperative closed its doors in 1969, the two minutes books in Series IV were apparently sent to Midland Cooperative, Inc. in Minneapolis, where they were placed with the CCW materials.

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Container List

SERIES I  MINUTES, REPORTS AND INCORPORATION RECORDS OF CCE, CCW, CCI AND MCI

Subseries 1 Central Cooperative Exchange
 
Box Folder Description Dates
1 1 Board of Directors Minutes May 1, 1916-Aug 24, 1928
2 1 Board of Directors Minutes Sept. 27, 1928-Jan. 12, 1939
3 1 Management Committee Minutes Apr. 2, 1919-Dec. 30, 1924
2 Articles of Incorporation 1917
3 Amendment to Articles of Incorporation 1924
4 Amendment to Articles of Incorporation 1928
5 United States trademark registration 1931
6 Correspondence regarding legal proceedings against Eben, MI, member cooperative 1931
7 General Manager's correspondence, reports, notices and news releases 1919-1936
8 Food Department Sales Meetings Minutes Dec. 28-30, 1933

Subseries 2  Central Cooperative Wholesale
 
3 9 Board of Directors Minutes Feb. 2, 1939-Nov. 26, 1943
4 1 Management Committee Minutes Jan. 12, 1939-Mar. 28, 1941
2 Dec. 1, 1943-Dec. 5, 1947
3 Jan. 21, 1948-Apr. 9, 1952
5 1 Board of Directors Minutes May 7, 1952-Nov. 29, 1955
2 Feb. 27-28, 1956-Nov. 10, 1958
3 Coordinating Committee Minutes Mar. 24, 1944-July 17, 1947
4 Board of Directors Meeting - Agenda and Reports Feb. 23-24, 1949
5 May 23, 1949
6 Dec. 7-8, 1949
7 Nov. 26-27, 1951
8 Mar. 3-4, 1952
9 Amendment to Articles of Incorporation 1931
10 1939
11 1940
12 1942
13 1946
14 1947
15 1948
16 1949
6 1 Amendment to Articles of Incorpoaration 1950
2 1953
3 1957
4 All Amendments to Articles of Incorporation 1917-1949
5 Annual District #5 Meeting 1950
6 Annual District Meetings 1951
7 Annual District Meetings 1952
8 Annual District Meetings Rating Sheets 1949
9 Annual Meetings Planning Committee 1952
10 Annual Meeting Resolutions 1952
11 Reports of "Distressed Cooperatives" Committee 1947-1948
12 Management Service for Patron Cooperatives 1947-1949
13 Report on a Comparative Analysis of the Grocery Operations of the Central States Cooperatives, Midland Cooperative Wholesale, and Central Cooperative Wholesale 1948
14 Organizational Manual and Chart 1954
15 State of Wisconsin trademark registration 1933
16 Canadian trademark registration 1937
17 Application for renewal of trademark registration 1956
18 Request to use new Co-op trademark design 1957
19 Minnesota and Michigan legal documents regarding CCW name change 1957
20 Trucking Department Driver's Manual 1948
21 Visit of German Co-operators 1952
22 Miscellaneous speech material n.d.
7 1 Installation instructions for various thermostats and pumps 1936-1952
2 Employees' Club, minutes, notices, reports 1944-1949
3 1950-1954
4 1955-1959

Subseries 3  Central Cooperatives, Inc.
 
8 1 Board of Directors Minutes Feb. 23, 1959-Nov. 2, 1962
2 Dec. 17, 1962-Dec. 5, 1963
3 Amendment to Articles of Incorporation 1959
4 1960
5 1963
6 Planning Manual for all CCI Divisions 1959
7 Working Agreement Between CCI and General Drivers, Warehousemen, Helpers, and Inside Employees, Local Union No. 288 1963
8 Organizational Manual for Shippers and Dispatchers 1964

Subseries 4  Midland Cooperatives, Inc.
 
8 9 Appraisal of the Consumer Goods Division--Part One: Store Operations Dec. 1964
10 Part Two: Retail-Wholesale Operations Dec. 1964
9 1 Appraisal of the Consumer Goods Division--Part Three: Consumer Survey Dec. 1964
2 Superior, WI, warehouse financial ledger 1965-1968
3 Trucking Department Policies and Procedures 1966

SERIES II  COOPERATIVE PUBLISHING ASSOCIATION
 
9 4 Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws 1933
5 Correspondence with Wisconson Department of State regarding Articles of Incorporation 1933
6 Amendment to Articles of Incorporation 1939
7 Certificates of Central Cooperatives, Inc. common stock 1954-1959
8 Sale of assets to Central Cooperatives, Inc. 1958
9 Articles of Dissolution 1961

SERIES III  FINANCE DIVISION RECORDS
 
9 10 Income and Expense Statement Jan.-Dec. 1932
11 Jan.-Dec. 1933
12 Jan.-Dec. 1934
13 Jan.-Dec. 1935
14 Jan.-Dec. 1936
15 Jan.-Dec. 1937
10 1 Income and Expense Statement Jan.-Dec. 1938
2 Jan.-Dec. 1939
3 Statement of Assets and Liabilities Jan.-Dec. 1917
4 Jan.-Dec. 1922
5 Jan.-Dec. 1923
6 Jan.-Dec. 1924
7 Jan.-Dec. 1925
8 Jan.-Dec. 1926
9 Jan.-Dec. 1927
10 Jan.-Dec. 1928
11 Jan.-Dec. 1929
12 Jan.-Dec. 1930
13 Jan.-Dec. 1930
14 Jan.-Dec. 1931
15 Jan.-Dec. 1932
11 1 Statement of Assets and Liabilities Jan.-Dec. 1933
2 Jan.-Dec. 1934
3 Jan.-Dec. 1935
4 Jan.-Dec. 1936
5 Jan.-Dec. 1937
6 Sales Reports Jan.-Dec. 1934
7 Jan.-Dec. 1935
8 Jan.-Dec. 1936
9 Jan.-Dec. 1937
10 Annual Reports and Analyses 1949
11 1955
12 1 Annual Reports and Analyses 1960
2 1961
3 Audit Report 1932
4 1936
5 1937
6 1939
7 Audit Report 1946
8 1947
9 1948
10 1950
11 1951
12 1956
13 1958
14 1959
15 1960
16 1961
17 Audit Report Summaries for Annual Meetings 1927-1934,1939
13 1 Financial Stabilization Program for under-financed cooperatives ca. 1948
2 Overdue receivables from CCW member co-ops 1949
3 Auditor's Office Report on Iron County Cooperative Services, Iron River, MI 1948
4 Credit Policy Reports and Directives 1948
5 Central Finance, Inc. ca. 1948
6 Finance Manual for Cooperatives 1950
7 Credit Sources for Farm Machinery Sales 1950
8 Balance Sheet (combined) for Maple and Wentworth, WI, Cooperatives 1948
9 List of Cooperative Receipt Book Holder n.d.
10 Numerical designators for patron cooperatives 1962

SERIES IV  EDUCATION DIVISION RECORDS

Subseries 1  Cooperative Schools
 
13 11 Cooperative Training Courses, Education Course outline 1941
12 Directors classes 1951
13 Economics and Social Theory Course outline 1942
14 Student listing 1921-1946
15 Bookkeeping class rosters 1949-1951
16 Farm machinery sales class 1951
17 Meat handling class 1950
18 Evaluation report 1953
19 Cooperatives Correspondence School, "Administration of Cooperatives," a twelve-lesson home correspondence course 1943
20 "The Cooperative Employee in Food and General Merchandise Stores," a fifteen-lesson correspondence course 1944
14 1 "Consumer Cooperation in Principle and Practice," a twelve-lesson correspondence course 1944
2 "The Cooperative Milkman," a ten-lesson home correspondence course n.d.
3 Graded answers to Courses I, II, and III n.d.
4 Enrollment ledger 1946-1951
5 Enrollments-Certificates-Terminations 1945-1951
6 Financial ledgers 1945-1948
7 Miscellaneous correspondence 1955

Subseries 2  Management Training and Development
 
14 8 Cooperative Management Development Program, correspondence, memos, reports, Part I 1959-1961
9 Part II 1957-1958
15 1 Cooperative Management Development Program, correspondence, memos, reports, Part III 1950-1956
2 A Guide to Modern Management for Cooperatives 1953
3 Midland Managers School, Basic Course: An Introduction to the Principles for Operating a Successful Local Cooperative Supply Association--Sections I-III 1953
4 Sections IV-VII 1953
5 Personnel Training Program from National Association of Retail Grocers 1952
6 Management Institute, Report on Goals and Organization 1954
7 Cooperative Adult Summer Institutes 1951-1954
8 Management Conference Handbook 1954
9 Midwest Institute of Modern Management, "Management Development,"  1957
16 1 Consumer Goods Division, "Procedure, Service, and Sales," 1964-1965

Subseries 3  Scholarship Contests
 
16 2 Proposal for a Cooperative Scholarship Program 1957
3 Information packet sent to all applicants 1957
4 Correspondence and memos 1957
5 Contest applications 1958
6 Essays from District #1 1958
7 District #2 1958
8 District #3 1958
9 District #4 1958
10 District #5 1958
11 District #6 1958
12 District #7 1958
17 1 Winnings essays 1958
2 Correspondence and memos 1958
3 Promotional materials for 1959 Contest 1958
4 Applications Part I 1959
5 Applications Part II 1959
6 Essays from all districts Part I 1959
7 Part II 1959
18 1 Winning essays 1959
2 Third Annual Youth Conference, correspondence and reports 1959
3 Registration forms 1959
4 Correspondence and memos 1959
5 Promotional materials for 1960 Contest 1959
6 Applications, Nos. 1-35 1960
7 Nos. 36-70 1960
8 Nos. 71-120 1960
9 Nos. 121-168 1960
10 Essays from District #1 1960
19 1 Essys from District #2--Part I 1960
2 Part II 1960
3 District #3 1960
4 District #4 1960
5 Winning essays 1960
6 Correspondence and memos 1960
7 Promotional materials for 1961 Contest 1960
20 1 Applications, Nos. 1-45 1961
2 Nos. 46-111 1961
3 Nos. 112-165 1961
4 Essays from Notheastern Minnesota 1961
5 Western Minnesota and North Dakota 1961
6 Michigan 1961
21 1 Essays from Wisconson 1961
2 Wisconson (Eau Claire)--Part I 1961
3 Part II 1961
4 Winning Essays, all districts 1961
5 Grand prize winning essays 1961
6 Evaluation of Scholarship Contest 1961
7 Promotional materials for 1962 Contest 1961
8 Questionnaire to member cooperatives re Scholarship Contest 1961
9 Correspondence and memos Jan. 4-Mar. 9, 1961
22 1 Correspondence and memos Mar. 24-Dec. 28, 1961
2 Applications, Nos. 1-48 1962
3 Nos. 49-96 1962
4 Nos. 97-144 1962
5 Winning essays 1962
6 Correspondence and Memos Jan. 2-Mar. 30, 1962
7 Apr. 2, 1962-Feb. 28, 1963
8 High school libraries receiving cooperative reference books for Scholarship Contest, Michigan, A-Z 1958-1963
23 1 High school libraries receiving cooperative reference books for Scholarship Contest, Minnesota, A-Z 1958-1963
2 Wisconson, A-Z 1958-1963
3 North and South Dakota, A-Z 1958-1963
4 Transferred file cards, all states

Subseries 4  Field Reports
 
23 5 Alpa, MI 1946
6 Barraga, MI 1946
7 Bergland, MI 1945-1946
8 Crystal Falls, MI n.d.
9 East Jordan, MI 1949
10 Engadine, MI 1946
11 Ensign, MI 1946
12 Escanaba, MI 1936-1947
13 Hermanville, MI 1937
14 Iron Mountain-Kingsford, MI 1934
15 Iron River, MI 1947-1956
16 Manistique, MI n.d.
17 Marengo, MI n.d.
18 Menominee, MI 1941
19 Rapid River, MI 1937
20 St. Ignace, MI 1940
21 Ada, MN 1946-1947
22 Anthony, MN 1950
23 Badger, MN 1945-1947
24 Bemidji, MN 1935-1945
24 1 Bertha, MN n.d.
2 Blackduck, MN 1938-1946
3 Brainerd, MN 1934-1948
4 Bronson Lake, MN 1945-1946
5 Carlton, MN 1946
6 Cass Lake, MN 1946-1947
7 Cotton, MN 1946
8 Crookston, MN 1936-1946
9 Deer Creek, MN 1935-1945
10 Fosston, MN 1939-1945
11 Greenbush, MN 1946
12 Glyndon, MN 1948
13 Gully, MN 1947
14 Hibbing, MN 1946
15 Hill City, MN 1938-1946
16 Hill River, MN 1942
17 Hovland, MN 1945
18 Keetwatin, MN 1936-1946
19 Kingsdale, MN 1943
20 Kelly Lake, MN 1946
21 Longville, MN 1946
22 McGrath, MN 1946
23 McGregor, MN 1946
24 Mahnomen, MN 1944
25 Mizpah, MN 1943-1946
26 Moorhead, MN 1938-1939
27 North Shore Cooperative Federation 1946
28 Pengilly, MN 1936-1946
29 Pequot Lakes, MN 1940
30 Remer, MN 1946
31 Staples, MN 1936-1946
32 Stephan, MN 1941
33 Twig, MN 1946
34 Walker, MN 1946
35 Warren, MN 1939
36 Winger, MN 1948
25 1 Almena, WI 1940-1946
2 Boulder Junction, WI 1947
3 Cable, WI 1939-1946
4 Glidden, WI 1946
5 Goodman, WI 1946
6 Gordon, WI 1939-1945
7 Hurley, WI 1946
8 Kennen, WI 1940-1945
9 Laona, WI 1941-1944
10 Marinette, WI 1944-1946
11 Mellen, WI 1937-1946
12 Moquah, WI n.d.
13 Minong, WI 1937-1947
14 Park Falls, WI 1941-1949
15 Radisson, WI 1944
16 Rhinelander, WI 1936-1945
17 Spirit, WI 1936
18 Springbrook, WI 1937-1944
19 Solon Springs, WI 1938
20 South Superior, WI 1937-1947
21 Washburn, WI 1934-1941
22 Correspondence relating to fieldwork 1937-1946
23 Reports on organizational fieldwork 1936-1946
24 Field Supervisors' reports 1947-1948

Subseries 4  Miscellaneous Records and Correspondence in Education Division Files
 
25 25 Organizational Charts and Job Descriptions 1938-1950
26 Financial analyses of new member cooperatives 1940-1949
26 1 Cooperative Discussion Groups, Outlines, Newsletters, Group Rosters--Part I 1941-1947
2 Part II 1941-1947
3 Advertising and Publicity 1946-1948
4 Correspondence and reports regarding the establishment of local credit unions 1946-1950
5 Budgets and Expence Reports 1946-1951
6 Merger plans, correspondence, reports, articles 1947-1949
27 1 Minutes and correspondence regarding formation of Arrowhead Cooperative Federation 1946-1948
2 Correspondence, reports, and directives regarding cash vs. credit issue 1948-1950
3 Correspondence with patron cooperatives regarding cash vs. credit issue 1948-1950
4 Programs and projects 1947-1952
5 Patronage Records Survey ca. 1949
6 Credit Union Information Survey 1950
7 Biweekly Activity Reports 1950-1952
8 Grand Rapids Project 1951
9 Membership and Trade Drive 1952
10 Correspondence 1955-1961
11 Cooperative League of the U.S.A., Report on National Structures and Staffs 1945-1946
28 1 Cooperative League of the U.S.A., Workbook for Educational Committees 1945
2 Brief Statistical Historical Analyses of Calumet, Duluth, and Virgina MN, Local Cooperatives 1947
3 Northern States Cooperative Guilds and Clubs Program and Activities 1949-1952
4 Bylaws of the Western Minnesota Cooperative Federation n.d.
5 Report on Survey of Range Cooperative Federation and its Member Societies 1948
6 Miscellaneous articles, pamphlets, leaflets and newspaper clippings on co-operativism 1939-1949
7 Consolidation Plan for District 15 Cooperatives 1951-1952
8 Informational file on Racine, WI, Consumers Cooperative 1947
9 Informational file on Chicago, IL, area cooperatives  1946-1947
10 Informational file on Lake Country, WI, Copperative Council 1947
11 Informational file on  Cooperative service stations 1947
12 Finland's Kulutusosuuskuntien Keskusliitto (Central League of Consumer Cooperatives) 1950
13 Arrowhead Hospital Campaign 1951
29 1 Finance drive lists 1958
2 Maps and mileage charts, MN and WI n.d.
3 Minutes of Upper Peninsula Cooperative Associations to consider merger 1960
4 Newspaper articles dealing with CCI-MCI merger 1963-1964

SERIES V  PEOPLE'S COOPERATIVE SOCIETY, SUPERIOR, WI
 
29 5 Board of Directors Minutes Apr. 14, 1925-Oct. 9, 1931
6 Nov. 11, 1930-May 16, 1935
30 1 Board of Directors Minutes May 28, 1935- March 4, 1937
2 Mar. 9, 1937-Feb. 6, 1940
3 Feb. 16, 1940-Sept. 26, 1944
31 1 Board of Directors Minutes Sept. 27, 1944-Sept. 28, 1949
2 Nov. 22, 1949-Jan. 9, 1953
3 Annual and Semi-annual Reports Aug. 15, 1927-Sept. 17, 1940

SERIES VI  VIRGINIA COOPERATIVE SOCIETY, VIRGINIA, MN
 
31 4 Board of Directors Minutes Feb. 1, 1960-Dec. 22, 1967
32 1 Board of Directors Minutes Jan. 26, 1967-Feb. 4, 1969

SERIES VII  PHOTOGRAPHS

Group One, Section One:
 
32 2 Adult Institutes 1949-1951
3 Advertising Department n.d.
4 Annual Meeting 1939
5 1940
6 1941
7 1943
8 1944
9 1945
10 1946
11 1947
12 1948
13 1949
14 1950
15 1951
16 1952
17 1954
18 1955
19 1956
20 1957
21 1958
33 1 Annual Meeting 1959
2 1960
3 1961
4 1962
5 1963
6 Annual Nominating and Review Committee 1960
7 1961
8 1962
9 1963
10 Appliance Department 1962
11 Area Managers 1957-1960
12 Auditing Department 1940
13 Automotive Department ca. 1959
14 Automotive Clinic 1954
15 Employee Meetings 1954
16 Bakery 1939-1963
17 Board of Directors 1929-1940
18 1941-1949
19 1953
20 1962
21 Building and Equipment 1939-1941
22 Building supplies 1947-1957
23 Buildings 1957-1959
34 1 CCW-CPA Directors 1955
2 Cabinet 1960
3 Central Accounting Service 1962
4 Clothing Department 1957-1963
5 Co-op paint
6 Co-op fertilizer factory 1937
7 Co-op pantry n.d.
8 Co-op Health Association, Superior, WI 1940-1941
9 Co-op Month Committee 1955
10 Cooperative Mutual Insurance Association 1940
11 Coffee Department n.d.
12 Community Relations 1958
13 Conferences 1947
14 Directors Nominating Committee 1958-1960
15 District Meetings 1929-1963
16 Educating Department 1939-1952
17 Employee Service Awards 1953-1962
18 Employees 1936-1960
19 Escanaba, MI, Branch Warehouse 1947
20 Exhibits 1944
21 Farm Machinery Department 1950-1955
35 1 Photographs, Feed Mill 1939-1962
2 Finance Conference 1949
3 Fortieth Anniversary 1957
4 Garage n.d.
5 Grocery Department 1958
6 Hardware Department 1952-1963
7 Historical, Annual Meeting 1932
8         Departmental photoes 1941
9         First Annual Meeting 1918
10         First Headquarters building n.d.
11         First Training School 1918
12         Management Committee 1928
13         Menagha, MN, Sampo Cooperative n.d.
14         Miscellaneous photographs 1918-1941
15         Red Star Chorus ca. 1926
16         Staff members 1928-1941
17         Training course 1926
18 Historical silver cuts 1919-1937
19 IBM 1957
20 Insulation Service 1946
21 Koski, Henry 1939-1948
22 Land and People Conference 1963
36 1 Photographs, Management Institute 1942-1947
2 Managers' Convention 1957-1958
3 1959
4 Managers' Meeting 1946-1961
5 Men's Chorus 1947
6 Merger with Cooperative Publishing Association n.d.
7 Midland meeting 1942
8 Midland merger 1963
9 Midwest Management Institute, Chicago, IL 1943
10 Miscellaneous Photographs 1942-1943
11 Movie: Challenge of Change n.d.
12 Parade entries n.d.
13 Personnel 1942-1943
14 Personnel Department 1958-1962

Group One, Section Two:
 
15 Petroleum Department 1952
16 Preferred stock sale 1948
17 Produce Department n.d.
18 1958-1962
19 Radio courses n.d.
20 Sales Promotion Department 1958-1959
21 Scholarship Program 1959-1961
37 1 Short courses 1943-1950
2 Staff 1958-1961
3 Stock Redemption Program n.d.
4 "Ten Percent Club" Program 1953
5 Test kitchen 1943
6 Thirtieth Anniversary 1947
7 Thirty-fifth Anniversary
8 Toy shows 1959-1963
9 Traffic Department n.d.
10 Training School 1934-1963
11 Trucking Department 1959-1963
12 Trucking Depot 1939-1960
13 Twentieth Anniversary 1937
14 Virginia, MN, Branch n.d.
15 Visitors 1934-1947
16 1948-1963
38 1 Wadena, MN, Branch n.d.
2 Warehouse 1959
3 Youth courses 1936-1943

Group Two, Section One:
 
38 4 Accounting Department 1943
5 Basketball, Ely, MN, Co-op team 1939
6 Basketball, Co-op Tournament 1947
7 Bayfield Electric Cooperative, Iron River, WI n.d.
8 Belgian Cooperative Sanitarium, Tombeck, Belgium n.d.
9 Berlin, Germany, Cooperative Apartment House n.d.
10 Bergemann, A. Grant n.d.
11 Bergengren, Roy F. n.d.
12 Berkeley Cooperative, Berkeley, California 1938
13 Binghamton, NY, Triple Cities Cooperative Assn. n.d.
14 Bookmobiles n.d.
15 Boulder Dam, Colorado n.d.
16 Bowling, Finnish American Assn n.d.
17 British cooperatives n.d.
18 Bulldozer, unidentified n.d.
19 Bulgarian cooperatives 1938
20 Campus Co-ops, Fargo, ND n.d.
21 Canadian Co-op Course 1936
22 Canadian visitors 1947
23 Canning demonstration 1938
24 Cartoons n.d.
25 Central Finance, Inc. n.d.
26 Central States Cooperative League, Congress 1934
27 Central States Cooperative League Headquarters, Chicago, IL n.d.
28 Chamblis, Bill 1960
29 Chatham-Eben, MI, local cooperative 1959-1963
30 Cherry, MN, local cooperative 1936-1957
31 Chetek, WI, local cooperative 1959-1963
39 1 Childs, Marquis n.d.
2 Chisholm, Brock, Dr. n.d.
3 Chisholm, John 1956
4 Chisholm, MN, Local Cooperative 1939-1945
5 Christiansen, R.E. n.d.
6 Christmas celebration 1936
7 Christmas illustration, silver cut 1939
8 Churchill, Winston S. n.d.
9 Clarissa, MN, local co-op n.d.
10 Clark and Sinervo 1943
11 Clark, Lincoln n.d.
12 Clementson, Ernest n.d.
13 Cloquet, MN, local cooperative n.d.
14 Cloud, Perry n.d.
15 Coady, M. M. Rev. n.d.
16 Coan, Donald 1947-1948
17 Coan, Victor n.d.
18 Colburn n.d.
19 Columbian Cooperative Housing Project n.d.
20 Community Health Center Guild, Two Harbors, MN n.d.
21 Conners, Oscar 1946
22 Cooley, Oscar n.d.
23 Co-op brand products n.d.
24 Co-op camps 1949-1963
25 Co-op Center at Tri State Fair 1940
26 Co-op Center at New York World's Fair 1939
27 Co-op cigars n.d.
28 Co-op drama tour 1946-1947
29 Co-op drug store n.d.
30 Co-op fertilizer 1962
31 Co-op Health Federation of America n.d.
32 Co-op Juniors 1937-1941
33 Co-op Homemakers 1960
34 Co-op local meetings 1943-1960
35 Co-op refinery tours n.d.
36 Co-op School, Des Moines, IA n.d.
37 Co-op schools 1937
40 1 Co-op schools, international n.d.
2 Co-op Shoppers, (radio program), Grand Forks, ND n.d.
3 Co-op summer festivals n.d.
4 Co-op Terminal, Duluth, MN 1943
5 Co-op Youth League n.d.
6 CPA, Annual Meetings 1943-1954
7           Board of Directors n.d.
8           Building n.d.
9           Drawings, sketches n.d.
10           Equipment n.d.
11           Food photographs 1962
12           Headers and mattes for "Leb Sez," feature n.d.
13           Historical 1949-1957
14           Miscellaneous farm photographs n.d.
15           Miscellaneous file photographs 1939-1958
16           Personnel 193-1960
17           Visitors 1946-1958
18 Cooperative Builder, headers and mattes n.d.
19 Cooperative Editorial Association, Directors 1958
20 Cooperative Hospital, Elk City, OK n.d.
41 1 Cooperative housing n.d.
2 Cooperative League of the USA, conventions 1933-1963
3 Cooperative oil refineries 1947-1961
4 Conscientious objectors 1945
5 Consumer's Union 1935
6 Copper Country, MI 1934-1954
7 Corya, William 1947
8 Cousins, Norman n.d.
9 Covington, MI, local cooperative 1940
10 Cowder, Leonard n.d.
11 Credit unions 1959-1962
12 Cumberland, WI, local cooperative 1941
13 Cyr, Frank W. n.d.
14 Dalles, WI, local cooperative 1941
15 Danders, W. H. n.d.

Group Two, Section Two:
 
16 Dantes, Hjalmer n.d.
17 Davidson, Don 1963
18 Davis, Elmer n.d.
19 Dearing, Dr. W. Palmer 1963
20 Deegan, W. J. n.d.
21 Delon, Bernardo n.d.
22 Democratic Farmer Labor Party Convention, Duluth, MN 1948
23 Denmark, cooperatives 1938
42 1 Denmark, cooperatives, mattes 1938
2 Detroit, MI, local cooperative n.d.
3 Detroit Lakes, MN, local cooperative service station n.d.
4 Dewey, Thomas E. n.d.
5 Dillonville, OH, local cooperative 1938
6 District Junior Committees 1939
7 Dornfield, Sam n.d.
8 Douglas, Helen G. n.d.
9 Douglas, T. C. n.d.
10 Douglas, W. O. 1939
11 Douglas County, WI, electric cooperatives n.d.
12 Dugoni, Enrico n.d.
13 Duluth, MN, local cooperative 1937-1949
14 Duluth, MN, local cooperative 1958-1963
15 Duluth, MN, Co-op laundromat 1962
16 Duluth, MN, Ocean Port, promotional brochure 1962
17 Duluth Herald News Tribune, strike n.d.
18 Dweyer, Clyde 1950
19 Dykstra, W. n.d.
43 1 Each-for-All-Club (youth club) 1939-1950
2 Eagle River, WI, local cooperative n.d.
3 Eastern Cooperative, Inc. n.d.
4 Eben Junction, MI, local cooperative n.d.
5 Edberg, Gideon n.d.
6 Eden, Anthony n.d.
7 Efaw, Randall n.d.
8 Egley, Charles n.d.
9 Ely, MN, local cooperative 1960-1963
10 Eisenmann, R. H. n.d.
11 Eliot, Charles W. ca. 1946
12 England n.d.
13 Erwin, MI, local cooperative n.d.
14 Essay Contest Winners, Wisconsin 1946-1947
15 Eveleth, MI, local cooperative n.d.
16 Ewen, MI, local cooperative n.d.
17 FHA Housing n.d.
18 Fargo, ND, Student Co-op 1949
19 Farm and Home Week, WI 1954
20 Farm Bureau Co-ops n.d.
21 Farm Machinery Service School 1949
22 Farmer Labor Party leaders 1939
23 Farmers Lake Co-op Camp, Rock, MI 1938
24 Farmers' Union Central Exchange 1933
25           Leaders 1939-1951
26 Farmers' Union Central Exchange, Livestock Association n.d.
27 Federal Milk Marketing Association n.d.
28 Fergus Falls, MN, local cooperative 1941
29 Finland's cooperatives n.d.
30 Finnish monument n.d.
31 Finno-Russian War 1939
32 Finnish visitors 1948-1955
44 1 Fitchburg, MA, local cooperative 1930
2 Forestry n.d.
3 Four-H Clubs 1961-1962
4 Fowler, Burt n.d.
5 Franklin Cooperative Creamery n.d.
6 Fredine, Kenneth n.d.
7 Freedom Fund n.d.
8 Freedom Train 1948
9 French cooperatives n.d.
10 French visitors n.d.
11 Froid, MI, local cooperative n.d.
12 Future Farmers of America 1962
13 Grand Coulee Dam 1938
14 Group Health Mutual 1950-1963
15 Hall, Rev. Cameron 1947
16 Halmekangas, William n.d.
17 Halonen, George ca. 1930-1950
18 Hansen, Alex n.d.
19 Hansen, Horace n.d.
20 Harma, Bert n.d.
21 Harris, Les n.d.
22 Hayes, A.J. 1938-1948
23 Hayrinen, Taisto 1946-1948
24 Heikkila, Sam n.d.
25 Heino, Emil n.d.
26 Helske, Klause n.d.
27 Hendrickson, Roy F. n.d.
28 Herman, MI, local cooperative 1938
29 Hibbing, MN, local cooperative 1960
30 Hill, Edwin T. 1952-1956
31 Hill, Helen V. 1947-1962
32 Hillila, Oliver 1947-1962
33 Hiltunen, Peter n.d.
34 Himango, Emil n.d.
35 Hot Lunch Program (school), Virginia, MN n.d.
36 House, Harold n.d.
37 Hultberg, Harold 1959
38 Indian mural n.d.
39 Indianhead Chorus 1961
40 Indianhead Cooperative Federation 1941
41 International Cooperative Alliance 1934-1957
Group Two, Section Three:
42 International Falls, MN, local cooperative 1941
43 Iron River, MI, local cooperative 1957-1962
44 Ishpeming, MI, local cooperative 1961-1963
45 Ishpeming, MI, Strike 1945
46 Jarvi, Henry 1940
47 Jarvi, Arvid n.d.
48 Jarvi, Jack n.d.
49 Johnson, George n.d.
50 Kainulainen, Arvid n.d.
45 1 Kaipainen, Aaro n.d.
2 Kanabec County, MN, Cooperative Oil Association n.d.
3 Karkela, Edwin J. 1962
4 Karky, Sakari 1950
5 Karvala, John n.d.
6 Kauppila, Oscar 1942
7 Kauppinen, Wilho 1961
8 Keinanen, Andrew 1948
9 Kemppainen, Carl 1947
10 Kettle River, MN, local cooperative 1948-1962
11 Kettunen, Arthur n.d.
12 Kiiskinen, Reino 1948
13 King, Helen 1958
14 Kivimaki, Edward 1950-1962
15 Kokkonen, Peter n.d.
16 Konno, William 1953
17 Koski, Ernest n.d.
18 Kukkola, Edwin 1960
19 Kunnari, Carl 1942
20 La Follete, Robert n.d.
21 Laakso, Frans Talman n.d.
22 Lahde, C. Paul n.d.
23 Lahde, Irene 1942
24 Lahti, Eugene n.d.
25 Laitala, Eugene n.d.
26 Lake, Helmi n.d.
27 Lammi, Floyd 1942
28 Lanto, Al 1947
29 Laporte, MN, local cooperative 1947
30 Lappala, Emilia 1959
31 Larni, Martti n.d.
32 Lassila, Matt n.d.
33 Latva, Ed 1961
34 Lauri, Andrew n.d.
35 Lauri, William n.d.
36 Laurila, Ray n.d.
37 Lehtinen, Walter n.d.
38 Lehtinen, Ray n.d.
39 Lehtinen, Don 1942
40 Levanpaa, Frank n.d.
41 Liimatainen, William 1942
42 Luck, WI, local cooperative n.d.
43 Lumppio, Archie n.d.
44 Lundeen, Wayne n.d.
45 Lundeen, William F. n.d.
46 Luopa, Wayne 1950
47 Lynn, Vivian n.d.
48 Lynn, Wally n.d.
49 Maki, Osmo n.d.
50 Maki, Niilo n.d.
51 Manni, John n.d.
52 Maple, WI, local cooperative n.d.
53 Marie, Andre n.d.
54 Mattila, Martin n.d.
55 McCabe, Thomas B. n.d.
56 Mehta, G. L. 1956
57 Merisalo, Toivo n.d.
58 Midland Co-op Incorporated Petroleum Depot n.d.
59 Minnesota Association of Co-ops 1957-1963
46 1 Moose Lake, MN, local cooperative 1960
2 Moose Lake fire of 1918
3 Mutual Service Insurance 1960-1961
4 Nakari, George n.d.
5 Nashwauk, MN, local cooperative n.d.
6 Niemela, August n.d.
7 Niemi, Otto W. 1963
8 Nisula, MI, local cooperative n.d.
9 North Hurley, WI, local cooperative n.d.
10 Northern States Cooperative League, Convention 1938
11 Northern States Cooperative Women's Guilds and Clubs, 25th Convention 1955
12 Northern States Cooperative Women's Guilds and Clubs 1941-1962
13 Northern Wisconsin Lake Superior Educational Association Conference 1961
14 Northern Wisconsin Women's Guilds, Conference 1940
15 Nukala, Jalmer n.d.
16 Nummivuori, John 1922
17 Nurmi, Charles n.d.
18 Nurmi, H.V. n.d.
19 Oja, Hugo 1948
20 Ojala, Arvo n.d.
21 Ontonagon, MI, local cooperative 1959-1960
22 Orr, MN, local cooperative 1959-1960
23 Paananen, William 1940
24 Palo Alto, CA, local cooperative n.d.
25 Park Rapids, MN, local cooperative 1963
26 Partanen, Dora n.d.
27 Passi, Lauri 1943
28 Paven, Helvi n.d.
29 Pelkonen, Matt n.d.
30 Peltola, Sulo 1959
31 Peltonen, Eugene 1955
32 Penttila, Penti n.d.

GroupTwo, Section Four:
 
33 Phillips, J.E. n.d.
34 Polari, Victoria 1962
35 Putikka, Art n.d.
36 Puumalainen, Edward 1942
37 Rahikainen, Barney n.d.
38 Rahja, William n.d.
39 Range Co-op Federation n.d.
47 1 Range Educational Society 1960
2 Range Youth League 1939
3 Rantala, Martin n.d.
4 Rasanen, Sam n.d.
5 Rautiola, Fred n.d.
6 Ray, MN, local cooperative n.d.
7 Rock, MI, local cooperative 1942-1963
8 Ross, Tom n.d.
9 Rossman, Otto 1947
10 Rovainen, Carl 1943
11 Ruoko, Einar n.d.
12 Saarela, Eero n.d.
13 Saari, Donald n.d.
14 Saari, Frank V. n.d.
15 Saari, Lee n.d.
16 Saari, T.A. 1947
17 Saarinen, Maria 1940
18 Sagal, Barbara 1962
19 Sahlman, Frank M. n.d.
20 Sahlman, Sam n.d.
21 St. Laurent, Louis n.d.
22 Salmi, Walter 1955
23 Salmi, Walter H. n.d.
24 Salo, George 1939
25 Salomaa, Arvid n.d.
26 Salomaa, Maire n.d.
27 Sanberg, Martha n.d.
28 Sanford, W. L. n.d.
29 Sarvela, Felix n.d.
30 Savola, Sam n.d.
31 Savola, Matt n.d.
32 Savola, Gus n.d.
33 Silvola, Richard n.d.
34 Simonson, Mike n.d.
35 Sinervo, Eugene n.d.
36 Sivula, Ed n.d.
37 State and county fairs, Minnesota and Wisconsin 1947
38 Torma, William n.d.
39 Torma, Hilda n.d.
40 Tuohino, Ahti n.d.
41 United States Rubber Company 1963
42 Vainionpaa, Jack n.d.
43 Van Puymbrouck, Henry n.d.
44 Vertanen, Wilho n.d.
45 Viding, Paava A. n.d.
46 Vidmar, Paul A. n.d.
47 Waisanen, John n.d.
48 Wentala, Arvid n.d.
49 Wierimaa, Walt n.d.
50 Williams, Sam n.d.
51 Wirtanen, George n.d.
52 Wisuri, Aarne n.d.
53 Wolf Lake, MN, Finnish Memorial 1952
54 Ylinen, Alli n.d.
55 Ylitalo, Sulo n.d.

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